SEPTEMBER 12 SEP 12
2017
TUESDAY TUE

FRONTIERS IN MEDICINE

WHAT IS THE NEW OLD? Dramatic advances in biomedicine are ushering in a new era where our lives are not just longer, they’re livelier. Come learn how science and technology are helping us stay healthy, sharp, and connected well into old age—and how our longer, livelier lifespans will shape society.

Join us for four fascinating talks about how biomedical breakthroughs are redefining what it means to be “old.” Then enjoy dinner and pose your own questions to more than two dozen world-leading scientists, Stanford University School of Medicine Dean Lloyd B. Minor, MD, and Stanford Health Care CEO David Entwistle.

Event Details

FRONTIERS IN MEDICINE
TUESDAY | SEPTEMBER 12                                                 
6:00—9:00 PM                                                                          
BING CONCERT HALL                                                           
327 LASUEN STREET | STANFORD                                            

PROGRAM
6:00 PM | RECEPTION
6:30 PM | TALKS
7:15 PM | DINNER AND Q & A

RSVP

Thank you for your interest in Frontiers in Medicine. Due to overwhelming demand and capacity issues, we have had to close registration for this event. We apologize for any inconvenience. If you have questions or would like to include your name on a wait list, please send an email with your name, guest's name (if any) and phone number to events@med.stanford.edu. We will notify you if space should become available due to cancellations. We look forward to having you join us for future Stanford Medicine events.

 

Speakers

FOREVER YOUNG

Are disease and decline inevitable as we age? Stem cell biology and regenerative medicine are re-writing the script.

Jill Helms, DDS, PhD
Professor of Surgery - Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery

SHARPER THAN EVER

Vision and cognition are two of our most cherished abilities. Breakthroughs in neuroscience are helping us keep them late into life.

Andrew Huberman, PhD
Associate Professor of Neurobiology and of Ophthalmology

IN CONTROL

Losing our ability to move or communicate cuts us off from the world and damages our sense of self. New technologies are offering unprecedented hope.

Jaimie Henderson, MD

John and Jene Blume - Robert and Ruth Halperin Professor
and Professor of Neurosurgery

A WHOLE NEW WORLD

Medical science is delivering longer and healthier lives. How will this affect us individually and as a society?

Laura Carstensen, PhD
Director, Stanford Center on Longevity
Fairleigh S. Dickinson, Jr. Professor in Public Policy
and Professor of Psychology

Faculty Hosts

Interested in the renowned Stanford scientists you'll meet? Click each name to see more about who they are and the work they do.

Previous events: