Why Giving Matters

Every dollar you give grows exponentially. It touches the people and projects you directly support, but also every student, every patient, and our entire community—including YOU.

We salute our donors who are making a difference.

  • Medical Innovator Establishes Scholarship to Pay Forward Gift of Education

    The motivation for Alfred P. Spivack, MD, to establish The Spivack Family Spirit of Philanthropy Scholarship was a desire to alleviate today’s medical students from some of the staggering debt that they incur during years of costly education.


  • Passionate Partnership Supports Stanford Research

    In October 2013, Suzanne Pride Bryan presented SCI member Allison Kurian, MD, MSc, with a check for $50,000. The carefully considered donation enabled Kurian to acquire huge amounts of molecular and genomic data for her “Oncoshare” breast cancer data-sharing project.


  • Simons Foundation Fuels Studies to Unravel Autism

    What lies at autism’s core? Over the decades, theories have abounded—most of them relying on clinical observations rather than brain circuitry. Only recently have sophisticated technologies allowed researchers to begin closing the gap between the consulting room and the laboratory.


  • Thomas and Mary Evslin Hear the Sound of Hope

    “When our granddaughter Lily was born,” says Mary Evslin, “she was tested for lots of things, including hearing. She flunked the hearing test. The hospital staff reassured her parents: ‘It happens all the time; take her to a pediatrician for a retest.’ She flunked again. Off they went to a pediatric hearing specialist, and she flunked again. We all got worried.”…


  • Institute for Immunity, Transplantation and Infection Seed Grants Will Help Crack Mystery of Immune System

    At age 40, Leslie Denend finished the Marine Corps Marathon in Washington, D.C., in 3.5 hours. Before turning 50, he learned that an autoimmune disease of unknown cause, cardiac sarcoidosis, had quietly ambushed him, triggering short-windedness, then arrhythmia, and ultimately congestive heart failure. Ten years later, in 2008, his name was added to the transplant list at Stanford Hospital & Clinics.


  • A Lifelong Relationship Leads to a Legacy

    It was 1941 when Frederick A. Fuhrman, a PhD student in pharmacology, arrived at Stanford for a summer project—one that would launch his career as a Stanford professor of physiology.


  • Physician-Scholar and His Family Foundation Back Investigators with Fertile and Flexible Minds

    The work of three leading Stanford researchers converges in an unlikely place—the Walnut River Valley of southeast Kansas.


Why stanford,
Why now?

1.

We are in a time of biomedical revolution but innovation is being threatened by declines in public funding.

1.

Without philanthropic investment to help fuel fundamental discovery, we could lose the next generation of promising young scientists.

2.

We are building a new 824,000-square-foot hospital that will redefine the model of health care in the 21st century.

2.

Gifts to the new Stanford Hospital will help empower us to provide a new standard of care for our community and the world.

3.

Stanford is poised to create a new standard of cancer care.

3.

With philanthropy, the Stanford Cancer Initiative’s bold approach, combining leading-edge science and compassionate care, could be shared worldwide.

4.

Hidden in zettabytes of data are patterns and insights that could lead us to better health.

5.

Philanthropy provides students an opportunity to follow their passions and the freedom to pursue the most far-reaching research.

5.

Stanford Medicine’s 1200 postdocs and 600 grad students have the potential to pursue bold, high-potential research ideas.

5.

Philanthropy provides students an opportunity to follow their passions and the freedom to pursue the most far-reaching research.

6.

Because together, in this place, at this moment, we have a chance to change the future of medicine.

6.

A gift funding education, research or patient care could make an impact starting tomorrow—and for generations to come.